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Part 2: Which Luxury BMW do you choose? BMW M760Li

BMW M760Li South African Review

Why the new BMW M760Li can be a frustrating car to own…

BMW 760Li South African Review

Read Part One: Which Luxury BMW do you choose? BMW 750Li

Having copious amounts of money comes with certain perks. Unlike us common folks, you don’t really have to deal with things like budget anxiety, traffic and even tax. Speaking of traffic, cars like the BMW 7 Series have longed serviced the needs of wealthy clients, but for many years the segment has been dominated by Mercedes Benz. Whilst Merc kept introducing longer faster and more opulent models, BMW didn’t seem too interested in the competition. For long BMW lovers begged for an M7 as the people of Mercedes Benz had vehicles like the S63 and S65 AMG to combine absolute power and absolute luxury. Eventually, BMW cracked. The answer? A long wheel base 7 Series called an M760Li. Using the G12 platform, the car offers enough legroom at the back for a man in stilts and enough power to render an industrial generator useless. With a power figure of 448kW/800N.m, it is the most powerful BMW ever made. That may seem ludicrous because the car weighs over 2 tons and it’s a 7 Series for Pete’s sake. The Germans are clever as the car has a traction advantage over its competitors. xDrive allows the BMW M760Li to propel from 0-100 km/h in 3.7 seconds. Yikes.

BMW 760Li South African Review

All this performance does create a problem for the owner of this car. Do you drive, or do you get driven? Traditionally an Li variant of a 7 Series would be the car your driver takes you from point A to point Z with. Now with all this exciting performance offered in the BMW M760Li, you may have to reconsider your arrangements. Sitting in the rear seat is a fantastic space to be. A middle partition makes the car a four seater only, which also creates a “first class” feel in the car. I have access to infotainment, seating adjustment, air conditioning and more whilst in the back. One can really forget their troubles in the back of this car. Up front however I have all the gadgets we’ve come to know and love in the current 7 Series. Gesture control, various safety options and driver aids makes this car a moving tech machine. Most excitingly though is access to the 6.6 litre V12 TwinPower Turbo engine. In Comfort mode, it’s as silent as a 740i. In Sport and Sport Plus it’s a different story…

BMW 760Li South African Review

You would think that the car would be a wild animal, screeching tyres and exhibiting a hooligan-like personality. This isn’t the case however. The car is mind blowing in terms of acceleration but very composed. The aim of this vehicle is to keep your suit looking suave, even under extreme driving conditions. The steering is near perfect for a car of this nature as it is not like the feeling you get on an M car. Depending on the mode you’re in, the weight of the steering changes but never enough to feel cumbersome. Quite frankly “visceral” is not the word you want when explaining what your high performance 7 Series feels like. Rather the word you want to use is “stately”, and stately it is. Another word you wouldn’t expect to use is nimble. The fact is in Sport Plus, the M760Li hides it’s weight better than a fat person in a corset. It’s a real engineering feat.

BMW 760Li South African Review

My quandary with this car though is what do you choose? If I were to be have the budget for it, I would love to exploit the capabilities of this car as the driver. At the same time traffic is a reality and like I said, rich people don’t have to sit in traffic. I’d rather be in the back seat for that. So what do you do? Keep a chauffeur on stand-by? It’s a real “first world problems” frustration. A gentleman from BMW at the launch of the car said that if he owned one, he would stick the chauffeur in the boot during the weekend and take him out in the week. The legalities around the concept are difficult, but he makes sense. BMW have a built a car that’s so good at being dual purpose, you’ll battle to pick where you want to be.

BMW 760Li South African Review

So then is the BMW M760Li worth the hype? In many respects yes, purely because they’ve created a healthy balance between luxury and performance. A bit too much power perhaps? There’s never such a thing as too much power. As long as it’s usable then so be it and the addition of xDrive makes this car much more usable than its rivals. For R2.6 million is it worth it? The figure is not what matters here. The statement is the key thing. For those looking to make a statement, what more do you want than an extra long Matte grey 7 Series with 20inch wheels and V12 badge on the C-Pillar? The M760Li is not the car you buy for just the luxury or the performance, much like a Mercedes – AMG S65, you buy it to say “I’m the best”. Period.  

 

Hyundai Tucson Sport overview

Tucson Sport South Africa

Hyundai Tucson Sport in South Africa

The Hyundai Tucson seems to be a very popular car in South Africa, it looks good, offers a good range of options and has an industry leading warranty. Those reasons alone maybe why Hyundai have sold over 7500 models in the last 13 months – not too shabby at all.

Tucson Sport South Africa

More and more vehicles nowadays feature a sports model with more aggressive styling and performance as there is a demand for these types of cars. So what if you loved the look and style and Tucson but wanted a little more mmph? Well up until recently Hyundai didn’t have an option, but now they do and it’s called the Tucson Sport – How imaginative.

Tucson Sport South Africa

With the Tucson Sport you get more power, 150 kW and 290 Nm of torque to be exact which are some very nice figures. Additionally, the Tucson Sport comes with a full body kit which doesn’t look great at all; it seems to have been stuck on the original body and comes across as a massive after-thought – the side skirts emphasise this. Matched to this are 19” black alloy wheels, unique to the Tucson Sport with low profiles tyres for better handling characteristics and visual appeal. Finally, Hyundai has added a new exhaust system which features four chrome pipes and an increase in engine noise to finish off the sports appearance.

The Tucson Sport will cost R499 900 which includes standard features such as the 8-inch infotainment system, navigation, Bluetooth, USB and Aux interfaces and a rear view camera. Auto A/C, cruise control and electronically adjusted leather seats are also included in the price along with Hyundai’s 7-year/200 000 km warranty, roadside assistance for 5 years or 150 000 km, and a 5-year/90 000 km service plan.

Personally, parts of the Tucson Sport look a little cheap and it feels like a rushed idea. As always, a full review will come soon.

Suzuki Baleno Driven Review

Long term test on the Suzuki Baleno in South Africa

Rewind to 1997 – Britney was fresh on the scene, George Clooney was Batman, Tony had just become Prime Minister and I had just learnt how to walk. These were all iconic events in their own right and while the world was marvelling at Mike Tyson biting off Evander Holyfield’s ear and some new book about a wizard named Harry was flying off the shelves, Volkswagen had just launched the Golf Mk. IV and the turd that was the first A-Class had just arrived, much to everyone’s dismay. “What a time to be alive” said nobody while looking at the A-Class’ obliquely mounted engine, a design so revolutionary that not a single car makes use of it some 20 years later.

One thing that was quite cool about the late 90’s, however, was how laid back the world was, relatively speaking, of course. Vehicle safety consisted of ABS for those who could afford it and motorists had only just started noticing the seatbelts in their cars, but atrocities such as the Daewoo Lanos and Hyundai Atos were also considered to be “fun and affordable” which we can all agree were complete lies. Living life on the edge was relatively simple, but being mollycoddled was a bit more difficult. Here we sit in 2017, however, and it seems as though the inverse is true – pampering and protecting has become the norm while wrangling a crocodile or playing with fireworks are just a few of the activities that are now frowned upon as they are either too dangerous or unfriendly to someone and their hamster.

I enjoy living life on the edge, which is why I switch the traction control off whenever I drive my boosty MINI in the rain – familiar, but frightening. It gives one a sense of what it would be like to share your own garden with a hungry lion. I do this, though, because it is difficult to find a car these days that exhibits what can only be described as old fashioned motoring. By this, I do not mean no seatbelts and oil leaks, but there used to be a sense that the human was integral to the operation of the vehicle, something that seems to be missing from almost everything built after 2010. I say almost, though because the Suzuki Baleno is the air-freshener in the change room that we have all been waiting for.

Launched towards the end of 2016, the Baleno is slightly larger than a Polo, but a lot cheaper than a Polo. Obviously it feels a bit cheaper too, but not bad cheaper – it’s good cheaper.

Having been handed the keys to a whole Baleno 1.4 GLX for the month of December, I wrapped the MINI up and left it in the garage, promising myself that no matter how tempted I was to take it for a spin, I’d turn to the Baleno for my thrills. A lot to live up to, then, but I was confident in the not-so-little Suzie’s abilities given the praise that the Baleno received when launched here in South Africa.

A supple ride, comfortable seats and a delightfully tactile steering wheel were a few of my favourite interior features while the silver plastic that swooshes its way along the dashboard was not. Bluetooth connectivity, a CD player, front and rear electric windows, cruise control and a trip computer all come as standard on the GLX model we had, as do the LED daytime running lights and BiXenon headlamps. So all in all, a wonderfully specced vehicle which, despite its compact dimensions, certainly has enough space for 5 as we discovered on our Christmas day jaunt to Rustenburg. The entire Whittle family, Christmas ham and all, piled into the Baleno and off we went.

Having embarked on much the same route, solo, the day before to Hartebeespoort damn, I was intrigued to see how the Baleno performed 5-up. Unsurprisingly, a sterling performance was delivered, achieving an average of 4.4 l/100km there and back. Thankfully, the 1.4-litre N/A four-cylinder petrol motor isn’t only good at sipping fuel, and has quite a bit of poke should you plant your foot and stir the gears properly. Power delivery is somewhat more akin to that of a 1.6-litre motor, despite the engine’s power figures of 68 kW and 130 N.m.

The Baleno is rather handsome and exhibits some interesting exterior design elements such as the swishy headlights with integrated DRL’s and flat bottomed taillights, but from certain angles it does look a bit…funny. A friend of mine’s mum even went so far as to describe it as being “beautiful” but her car history consists of a pistachio green Nissan Micra and an old-shape Murano so I wouldn’t listen to her. Our test unit was finished in Ray Blue metallic which does well to highlight the vehicle’s many chrome accents.

Priced from R199 900 (R229 900 for our test unit) the Baleno offers a good value for money product which won’t unnecessarily mollycoddle you, but it won’t leave you sitting at the edge of your seat either. It comfortably establishes itself in the “good old-fashioned” category, but without being old fashioned – something that few cars are able to do these days. It’s honest, it’s fun to drive, incredibly spacious and punches well above its weight, and while not even the ‘range’ reading on the trip computer allows you to live life on the edge – it reads ‘- – – ‘ once you hit 30 km of range – it was definitely able to feed me sufficient driving thrills for a whole month.

The Baleno’s challenge was simple – keep me away from the MINI for a month, and it did. Good job Suzuki.

The New Audi Q2 : It Really Is Untaggable

You have probably seen the advertising campaign for the new Audi Q2 – #untaggable is what they call it and that is exactly what it is. The Audi Q2 is difficult to define, where does one place it? What do you compare it to? These were questions that all ran through my mind during the launch of the Q2 in Cape Town.

So what exactly is it?

Audi define the Q2 as a compact SUV, which fits into the premium A0 section of the market. It could easily be described as a crossover, or even a sporty hatchback. Audi South Africa don’t view this car as having a direct competitor and it’s easy to see why. Over the course of the launch, it started to become clear what this car is and the type of person it is aimed at.

The Audi Q2 has a very youthful feel about it, it’s hip, funky, extremely stylish and very “out there”- you could say.  This car is not aimed at the type of person who would buy a Q3 or Tiguan for example, those cars, although great, come across as vehicles suited for a small family, but more notably, they are not particularly exciting either.

The Q2 is aimed at the younger market, an audience in their twenties who are designers, creators and are starting out in the business world – these are the kind of people who I envision would be interested in being untaggable, or at least sitting in it on the daily commute.  The interesting thing about the Q2 is that it is very similarly priced to the bigger Q3, but appeals to a totally different audience. So in effect, the Q2 is not a lesser car, (albeit a little smaller) when compared with the Q3, it just has a different purpose.

Styling

The Q2 is nothing like you have seen before, it has edgy design and sharp features. Prominent design features which you will notice are the concaving lines along the side – a unique feature to the Q2 which gives it a different look to anything you will currently find on the road. An Edition #1 version of the Audi Q2 is due for release later this year, this model will feature a unique Quantum Grey Colour, which looks very similar to Nardo Grey, with a little bit of sparkle.

The Q2 is the first of new Audi models to feature this design style, and we can expect future models to follow a similar pattern. Audi have a big 2018 planned with a host of new and updated models, including the Q8.

Step inside the new Audi Q2 and it will feel very similar to the interior of the Audi A3 and other Audi models, there is nothing that would strike you as new or majorly different – it looks and feels very Audi-ish with a clean design and classy feel. The optional sports seats are a nice option to have and were comfortable, they also filled the cabin nicely and added to its visual appearance.

The Audi Q2 will also be available with Pilot Assist, which is the fully digital dash display which allows different views for Car Information, Music and Navigation. This is paired with the 12” TFT screen on the Dashboard. For the record, the Pilot Assist is one of my personal favourites. The Q2 is the only vehicle in its segment to offer a TFT binnacle and it’s an option I’d certainly tick.

The interior is let down slightly by the door cards, They look and feel a little cheap as the lower portions are covered in hard, black plastic. It would have been nice to feature some Alcantara or leather like other areas of the interior. I do understand the reasons behind it though, cost being one of them.

In terms of space, the rear seating area was limited in this regard so if you are tall, unlike me, you may find it quite cramped. The boot space is adequate though with 405-litres on offer, which expands to 1050-litres with the rear seats folded.

How Does It Drive?

The Q2’s we had for the day featured Audi’s 1.4 TFSI engine, which produces 110kw and 250Nm. This is a proven engine in other cars, such as the A3 and it performed as expected. Power delivery is smooth through both the 7-Speed S-Tronic Automatic and the 6-Speed manual transmissions. I did feel that it lacked torque at low RPM, especially in second gear, which was something that I also noticed on the 1.0L variant. This could also have something to do with the COD (Cylinder On Demand) technology which is built into the 1.4 Engine. This feature disables Cylinders two and three at loads of up to 100Nm from 1400rpm with the S-Tronic, and from 2000rpm with the manual variant.

The Chassis and the suspension is where everything comes together and the Audi Q2 really impresses, because it has a high design, one may think that handling would not be one of the car’s best assets.

The Q2 was rigid and as we drove along the bumpy Bainskloof Pass, the car did not feel unsettled with the suspension absorbing the rough surface, even under braking and sharp bends, the Q2 performed well. It has a sharp and accurate turn-in and a very neutral feel, only getting out of shape and providing just a little understeer on one heated occasion. You can enter a corner at speed and trust that the little Q2 will handle it well.

The 110kW produced by the 1.4 TFSI coupled with the great handling and chassis of the Q2 makes for a fun car, which suits its overall persona down to the ground. A young buyer will not have to be worried about getting bored with the Audi Q2.

Driver Assists

Audi have given the Q2 some of their driver assist packages as optional extras. The first of these is Pre Sense which uses a front radar system to detect hazardous situations with other vehicles and pedestrians and will apply braking if necessary. Park Assist is also available, which does a little bit more than the name suggests and will basically park your Audi Q2 for you. Further to this, Cross Traffic Rear Assist helps when reversing from parking spaces, by sensing other cars which could potentially cross your path. Audi also offer Side Assist and Adaptive cruise control on the Q2 to finalize the driver assist packages.

Powertrains

The Q2 is currently only available as the 1.4 TFSI variant. The 1.0 TFSI and 2.0TDi will be available from May, producing 85kW and 200Nm and 105kW and 350Nm respectively. Unfortunately, a Quattro option will be not available in South Africa due to market placement and cost of the vehicle, however it will be available overseas.

Price

Here is where things get interesting, with a starting price of R434 500 for the 1.0L base model and rising to R565 000 for the 2.0 TDI model, the Q2 is not a cheap car. Yet, it is aimed at a young market.

Audi plan to solve this issue with attractive finance offers and a special guarantee buy-back specifically for the Q2. Audi have done their research and I am positive that the Q2 will work for them. The price is a big drawback for the younger market, especially with a well- specced vehicle. However, Audi do feel confident that it should not be too much of an issue – only time will tell.

 

  • Audi Q2 1.0T FSI manual: R 434,500
  • Audi Q2 1.0T FSI S tronic: R 453,000
  • Audi Q2 1.0T FSI Sport manual: R 464,500
  • Audi Q2 1.0T FSI Sport S tronic: R 483,000
  • Audi Q2 1.4T FSI Sport manual: R 511,000
  • Audi Q2 1.4T FSI Sport S tronic: R 529,500
  • Audi Q2 2.0 TDI Sport S tronic: R 565,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The young executive: Mercedes-Benz CLA 200

I must confess, the CLA is not my favourite Mercedes-Benz. I always found it to be oddly shaped and awkward – it looks like the uglier younger brother of the CLS. That being said, my opinion of the car changed after driving the face-lifted CLA 200, a car that I thought I would’ve hated. See, most of our interactions with Mercedes’ products have been with their hardcore Mercedes-AMG range. The likes of the A45, GTS and C63 are a lot to take in. The C63 was the best when it came to living with the car, but the others were just unpleasant from a daily driving perspective. So getting the “bottom of the range” CLA was a welcome idea and when it arrived – it looked much better in appearance than I expected. It had the optional AMG Line fitted to it, making it very sporty looking. The larger bumpers with red accents on the front and rear give the illusion of something much sportier than the 1.6 litre Turbocharged engine up front.

The interior of this specific car was also quite lovely. A combination of leather and cloth on the sport seats looked great and the overall cabin was a nice place to be. Being in this business of reviewing cars can make you feel rather numb as you hop in and out of various machines each week. When you drive a car that makes you feel good, you tend to remember it and funnily enough, the CLA made me feel this way. See, I’m a young person that lives in the North of Johannesburg, a part of town that measures status as a very important thing. In the week of me driving the CLA, I noticed that others’ perception of me was different to when I drive other cars.

Stepping out of a sporty looking Mercedes-Benz aimed at young people gives you a good feeling, as though you’ve achieved something others haven’t. That’s the thing about cars like the “ordinary young folks’ Mercs”. The A and CLA Classes are cars for young executives. If you drive the AMG variants of these cars, it’s not the same because the price tag of those cars often creates debate in the car world. If I drive a CLA 45, people would ask why I didn’t buy an RS3 Audi for instance, or even a used BMW M4. But if a drive a CLA 200 that looks great, people respect the fact that I chose to spend my R475 000 on this car with less debate. It’s strange.

For somebody who isn’t a performance freak or even a car enthusiast but still wants the feeling of exclusivity, cars like the CLA 200 make perfect sense. Even more sense than an A Class because it offers more practical value. The little engine is also quite punchy with 115kW and 250Nm. Although the AMG Line makes things firmer, the ride quality was not too compromised, but ever so slightly sportier. Considering all these things, my mental checklist started ticking things off. Does it look good? Yes. Does it have enough space for a little one? Yes. Does it say I’m successful? Yes. Lastly, is it affordable? Kind of. Well if you’re that young executive and you’ve got a good job, you’ll most likely be looking at cars within the R500 000 mark, so if that’s the case then, yes.

It was refreshing driving a regular Mercedes-Benz. The brand has come a long way to create products that appeal to a younger market. This is a tricky market that Mercedes has been able to appeal to in terms of status. Many things aside, the most important thing most young people wonder about driving a specific car is “what does it say about me?” In the case of the updated CLA range, it can make people say, “That person is doing well for themselves”. As vain as this sounds, we live in a vanity driven society and if that’s what the Mercedes-Benz brand appeals to, they’ve got a winning product.

Hyundai Increase Tucson Range with Diesel Models

The Hyundai Tucson has proven to be a very popular car in 2016 and was also recently named a finalist for the SGMJ Car Of The Year 2017. The Tucson may now appeal to an even broader market as Hyundai have introduced a further two models in the Tucson range.

The first of these new diesel models is the Tucson 1.7 executive turbodiesel producing 85kw and 280Nm of torque, which will peak between 1250 – 2750rpm. The 1.7 Executive is fitted with a 6-speed manual gearbox and will have a starting price of R439,000.

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The second model is the Tucson R2.0 Elite, featuring a 2L turbodiesel producing 130kw and 400Nm of torque, peaking low in the rev range between 1750-2750rpm.  This model will feature all the standard options which are supplied with the Elite petrol variants, including 18″ alloy wheels. The R2.0 Elite model will feature a six-speed automatic gearbox and will start at R519,000.

Hyundai’s 5-year/150 000 km manufacturer’s warranty, enhanced by the additional new groundbreaking 7-years/200 000 km drivetrain warranty, comes standard with the all-new Hyundai Tucson package, as well as roadside assistance for 5-years or 150 000 km.

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Opel Astra Sport – The Safe Man’s Car.

 

I have been driving the Opel Astra for around a week now and have no significant problems with it, its comfortable, somewhat stylish and has lots of features and tech; It even won car of the year.

The Opel Astra Sport features a 1.4 Turbo motor producing 110kw, and once again, it’s a good engine, pretty nippy and 3rd gear especially pulls nicely.  The rear of this vehicle has heated seats for passengers and the cabin is spacious, likewise the boot. The exterior styling has received mixed reviews from the people I have spoken to; it looks better in some colors than others. But once again, it boasts a modern design with sharp edges and lines which seem like the going look nowadays.

A feature I liked on the Astra is the entertainment system,it’s easy to use and even when I’m listening to music from my iPhone, I can change to a radio station by hitting the pre-stored stations which show at the bottom of the screen. Easy and straightforward.

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So, in reality, it’s an excellent vehicle. But, my conclusion is that this is a safe man’s car. A car for people who don’t have any interest in cars, What do I mean? Well, I’m sure you have heard the term “play it safe” and that is exactly what this car feels like. It doesn’t inspire me, it doesn’t have a spark, I wouldn’t say its boring, but its pretty close.

For me, a vehicle needs to have a personality; there must be something about a car which makes you enjoy driving it. It might not be the comfiest car to drive or the car with the most tech, but it has something that you enjoy or connect with, then it doesn’t matter. For me, the Astra lacks that vital feeling, that character.

For others, a car is just a tool to get from A to B, and if you’re a person who looks at it from that perspective, then the Astra is a proven family hatch, it’s one of the best cars you can buy in its class, if not on the road. Your journey will be easier, safer and much more connected in an Astra, and that is a fact, It just depends if you are a car person or not.

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Volvo XC90 T5 R-Design

Naturally, as humans, we have high expectations of certain things. If for example, you had booked a few nights at a top 5-star hotel you would expect the room, food, and service to be excellent. Maybe you decided to treat yourself and fly business class, once again you have certain expectations that you expect to be met. These same thoughts ran through my head before the Volvo XC90 arrived at our offices. I never really have expectations when testing new cars because I prefer to have an open mind on every vehicle I drive. When the car comes with the title “Car of the year 2016” though, it’s kind of hard to ignore. My expectations were high as I had never driven an XC90 before this and was excited to find out what all the hype was about.

The XC90 I drove was the T5 R-Design in Onyx Black Metallic, wow it’s a looker. I don’t mind saying that this car is one of if not the best looking SUV on the road right now. The R-design sports body kit and 20-inch wheels set this car apart. I fell for this car before I even drove it and that does not happen often. The technical aspect of this car is advanced with world first items such as pedestrian and cyclist detection, to the head up display. It’s got the lot! One thing I really enjoyed in this car which I struggle to enjoy in others, is the Sensus connect touchscreen infotainment system. Many of the full touch screen systems in cars today annoy me as they often don’t work properly. They can be difficult to use which distracts from the road. The Sensus system is different, It works well and is very responsive.

Behind the wheel

Driving this vehicle is an experience you don’t often get, but it’s one you will remember. The 187 kW provided from the 2L 4-cylinder power plant is nearly perfect for the size and weight, big SUV’s don’t always need to be overpowered monsters. I found the XC90 to be very driver based, everything focuses on you and the non-intrusive head up display finishes this feeling off. It’s not just the tech that makes this car great, though, it’s also how it drives. Remove half of the gizmos and you would still get the same experience every time you drive it. It makes me feel like I am in command of a futuristic spaceship, I feel in charge on the road and that is an awesome feeling to have. The driving performance of this vehicle is also very enjoyable, it accelerates and handles well for its size and this fits in with the sporty design. If batman drove an SUV, this would be it.

The problem with the XC90 is that there is no problem. I went looking for issues or things I didn’t like and the only issue I found was that the ambient lighting system in the doors and footwells don’t change colour like the overhead ambient lights. Pretty insignificant I know. Apart from that, the attention to detail is on point, even the start/stop switch is worthy of an award. My 300 words are long gone, but I’m going to finish with this. This is one very special vehicle.

 

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Playing with Ford’s GT configurator.

How will have yours? : The new Ford GT.

The Ford GT is a car that has been a cult legend for decades now. By now, if you’re a petrol head you will know that the new iteration of the iconic super car is amongst us. And there is an interesting way you can (or can’t) obtain yours.

You can now spec your very own Fort GT to your exact requirements for delivery to your door.  Well for some people that it is true, but the thing with the Ford GT is that you don’t pick it, it picks you.  Yes, if you have the means and interest to acquire a Ford GT, you will first need to fill out an online application form with seventy fields for you to populate to see if your Ford finds you worthy.

Ford have not yet released pricing on the new GT, but the fact that it has a carbon fibre body and a V6 engine producing over 600bhp,  this tells you that it’s going to be rather pricey.

We can all dream, and to make our dreams a little more real, Ford has released an online configurator. A word of caution, you’ll probably end up drooling once you’re done because it looks that good. Spec yours here: www.fordgt.com/en-gb/performance/gt/

The images below are my personal configuration, I’ve got a thing for black on black at the moment.

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Smug life: Driving the Range Rover Sport

Our week with Range Rover Sport SDV6 SE

If you haven’t yet noticed, many Range Rover owners bear a similar facial expression when they’re in their cars. It’s a difficult look to describe. Is it one that says “I’m better than you?” or “I have more money than you?” Who knows, but it’s definitely an expression that gives off an air of superiority. Why is this the case? Why does almost every Range Rover driver don this mug? We had a recent opportunity to find out when Land Rover South Africa scheduled us to drive the SDV6 variant of the Range Rover Sport.

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The car in question was the SE model, which is slightly less fancier than the HSE in terms of aesthetics and specifications. Despite this, the size of the car still commands a great deal of presence whether it’s parked in a car park or driving on the road. The vehicle we had in our possession also had the air suspension which was a short man’s dream because you can add more centimetres to the ride height, allowing you to peer into the car stopped next to you at the traffic lights and proof read the drivers text message.

The most distinct feature about the Range Rover Sport is how the car drives like a hot knife in butter. It simply glides along whatever road surface it is faced with, accompanied by the slightly audible sound of the diesel V6 engine which produces 215kW.  The silence in the cabin is business class like and like business class, the car allows you to think long and hard about how much more better your driving experience is compared to the hatchback driving alongside you. What adds to this is the seating position created by the armrest that allows for maximum comfort behind the wheel. A simple yet luxurious dashboard with a touch screen infotainment is your interior view.

This is where we feel the facial expression comes from. The car makes you and others feel very aware of the fact that you’re driving over a million rand worth of metal, rubber and leather. They say absolute power corrupts and it was safe to say that we had been corrupted during our week long test drive. Nearing the end of the week, we could feel that our noses were positioned more upwards and our overall demeanour had changed. “How dare that driver think he can cut us off?” “Can he not see our RANGE ROVER coming?” are but a few of the thoughts that featured in our minds. Any opportunity to use the 600Nm was not wasted.

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To say that the Range Rover Sport makes the driver feel good about himself is an understatement. Interestingly this is not due to the car being the absolute best in its segment. Of course it is highly capable but the competition’s products are very capable too. This car has two major things going for it, pedigree and class. For decades the words “Range Rover” have been associated with a specific lifestyle and elegance. Even though the word “Sport” alludes to a racing nature, the V6 diesel is more about sophistication and comfort than anything else. This is why the Range Rover Sport can be seen in many business parks around the world, it’s as much a statement than it is a car.

It’s easy to get caught up in the smug life of driving a Range Rover in the city. If it weren’t for the Land Rover Experience that we attended in the past, we would think that all the suspension settings were there for the drivers ego, which is really not the case. The various on and off road features in the Sport are all functional. Having driven the Range Rover Sport off-road, one really sees what a serious case of multiple personality syndrome the car has. On the one end, it’s wearing a business suit and condescending over other cars in traffic. On the other end, it’s wearing a Khaki shirt and climbing various ascents and descents.

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Considering all of this, assuming the drivers of most Range Rover Sport’s know this, one can understand why the expression is there. It is a fact that the Range Rover is a brilliant car in its segment. It offers space, luxury and performance packaged in a way that is very memorable indeed. It is the gentlemen’s choice in its class.

Price:

R 1,227,400